How intimate partner violence affects women Veterans

Dr. Katherine Iverson is a clinical psychologist and researcher in the Women’s Health Division of the National Center for PTSD. (Photo by Cydney Scott)

This interview originally appeared in VA Research Quarterly Update.

Dr. Katherine Iverson is a clinical psychologist and researcher in the Women’s Health Division of the National Center for PTSD. She is also a researcher at the Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research (CHOIR); both centers are located at the VA Boston Healthcare System. In addition, she is an associate professor of psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on women’s health and trauma—in particular, interpersonal violence and intimate partner violence. In 2014 she received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for her research into the effects of violence on women’s health and associated health care needs.

VARQU spoke with Iverson about the work she is doing with women Veterans who have experienced intimate partner violence, and those who have sustained a traumatic brain injury as a result of a violent encounter with an intimate partner.


Can you tell us about the presentation that you gave in December 2017 at the National Institutes of Health on intimate partner violence and TBI in women Veterans?

It was definitely an honor to be invited to this event on understanding TBI and violence among women. The overall goal of the NIH conference was to understand gaps in knowledge as it relates to the issue of TBI experienced by women.

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